Curtin Clears Wreckage so Coral Reefs Can Thrive

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Curtin Clears Wreckage so Coral Reefs Can Thrive

The crew of Port of Long Beach-based Curtin Maritime Corp. returned Tuesday from a job in Palmyra Atoll where they collected wreckage from three ships onto a barge and brought it back. The cleanup was necessary because the wreckage was endangering the reefs and the ecosystem in the ocean. The decomposing shipwrecks, the largest being a 120’ fishing vessel, were enriching the water with iron and causing “black reef,” a condition in which evasive species of coral and algae to grow rapidly and dominate the other coral species on the reef. Now that the debris is gone the hope is that other species will return.
0313_NWS_LPT-L-CURTIN7-L

0313_NWS_LPT-L-CURTIN7-L The crew of Port of Long Beach-based Curtin Maritime Corp. returned Tuesday from a job in Palmyra Atoll where they collected wreckage from three ships onto a barge and brought it back. The cleanup was necessary because the wreckage was endangering the reefs and the ecosystem in the ocean. The decomposing shipwrecks, the largest being a 120’ fishing vessel, were enriching the water with iron and causing “black reef,” a condition in which evasive species of coral and algae to grow rapidly and dominate the other coral species on the reef. Now that the debris is gone the hope is that other species will return.
0313_NWS_LPT-L-CURTIN6-L Steven Chew is a member of the crew from Port of Long Beach-based Curtin Maritime Corp. that returned Tuesday from a job in Palmyra Atoll where they collected wreckage from three ships onto a barge and brought it back. The cleanup was necessary because the wreckage was endangering the reefs and the ecosystem in the ocean. The decomposing shipwrecks, the largest being a 120’ fishing vessel, were enriching the water with iron and causing “black reef,” a condition in which evasive species of coral and algae to grow rapidly and dominate the other coral species on the reef. Now that the debris is gone the hope is that other species will return.
0313_NWS_LPT-L-CURTIN8-L The crew of Port of Long Beach-based Curtin Maritime Corp. returned Tuesday from a job in Palmyra Atoll where they collected wreckage from three ships onto a barge and brought it back. The cleanup was necessary because the wreckage was endangering the reefs and the ecosystem in the ocean. The decomposing shipwrecks, the largest being a 120’ fishing vessel, were enriching the water with iron and causing “black reef,” a condition in which evasive species of coral and algae to grow rapidly and dominate the other coral species on the reef. Now that the debris is gone the hope is that other species will return.
0313_NWS_LPT-L-CURTIN4-L The crew of Port of Long Beach-based Curtin Maritime Corp. returned Tuesday from a job in Palmyra Atoll where they collected wreckage from three ships onto a barge and brought it back. The cleanup was necessary because the wreckage was endangering the reefs and the ecosystem in the ocean. The decomposing shipwrecks, the largest being a 120’ fishing vessel, were enriching the water with iron and causing “black reef,” a condition in which evasive species of coral and algae to grow rapidly and dominate the other coral species on the reef. Now that the debris is gone the hope is that other species will return.
0313_NWS_LPT-L-CURTIN2-L The crew of Port of Long Beach-based Curtin Maritime Corp. returned Tuesday from a job in Palmyra Atoll where they collected wreckage from three ships onto a barge and brought it back. The cleanup was necessary because the wreckage was endangering the reefs and the ecosystem in the ocean. The decomposing shipwrecks, the largest being a 120’ fishing vessel, were enriching the water with iron and causing “black reef,” a condition in which evasive species of coral and algae to grow rapidly and dominate the other coral species on the reef. Now that the debris is gone the hope is that other species will return.
0313_NWS_LPT-L-CURTIN3-L The crew of Port of Long Beach-based Curtin Maritime Corp. returned Tuesday from a job in Palmyra Atoll where they collected wreckage from three ships onto a barge and brought it back. The cleanup was necessary because the wreckage was endangering the reefs and the ecosystem in the ocean. The decomposing shipwrecks, the largest being a 120’ fishing vessel, were enriching the water with iron and causing “black reef,” a condition in which evasive species of coral and algae to grow rapidly and dominate the other coral species on the reef. Now that the debris is gone the hope is that other species will return.
0313_NWS_LPT-L-CURTIN1-L The crew of Port of Long Beach-based Curtin Maritime Corp. returned Tuesday from a job in Palmyra Atoll where they collected wreckage from three ships onto a barge and brought it back. The cleanup was necessary because the wreckage was endangering the reefs and the ecosystem in the ocean. The decomposing shipwrecks, the largest being a 120’ fishing vessel, were enriching the water with iron and causing “black reef,” a condition in which evasive species of coral and algae to grow rapidly and dominate the other coral species on the reef. Now that the debris is gone the hope is that other species will return.
0313_NWS_LPT-L-CURTIN5-L This is the tugboat that allowed the crew to collect the debris along with other equipment.

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